EAPs: A Hidden Resource

It’s been a long time since I’ve had a full-time job with health insurance benefits. Six years, to be exact. But even when I had my own benefits available, ever since my husband and I got married in 2003, we always went with his benefits plan because his employer seemed to have the most robust plan for the lower price, compared to mine.

I’ve never paid much attention to the details of our health insurance plan. To me, insurance is a necessary evil. All I knew was that it had morphed over the years from co-pays to deductibles, and when enrollment time came around I’d complain to my husband that we seem to be paying more with each passing year and yet we’re getting less and less coverage. A sign of the times, I guess. Still, I’m extremely grateful to have insurance at all.

We used to pay a co-pay for visits, and had to get referrals to see specialists, but last year and this year we moved to a deductible plan. Now instead of co-pays, we pay a premium each pay period, have a {pretty high} family deductible to meet, and once that’s met, the insurance plan covers our doctor’s visits at 100%.

I hadn’t been to the dermatologist since 2009, and with the recent news reports about skin cancer, Ben and I decided it was time he and I get checked. I called our provider to double-check that I didn’t need a referral, since I couldn’t for the life of me remember. The customer service rep I spoke with reminded me that referrals weren’t required with our plan. While he was reviewing our account, I happened to make a comment about how far we were from meeting our deductible and the cost of doctor’s visits, and how I’d love to be able to see my therapist again but since I’m working for free to start-up my non-profit and we’re living on one income right now it wasn’t really possible.

Here’s where the Employee Assistance Program comes in. The rep told me that my husband’s company participates in an EAP which would allow for me to see my therapist for eight visits completely free, if I qualified after speaking with an intake counselor over the phone. I immediately asked to be transferred and had a ten-minute conversation with a kind woman who assured skeptical ole’ me that the benefit was most certainly available for my use and she’d email me the authorization code so I can book my appointment. There’s nothing dire going on with me, just the usual stress of being a stay-at-home mom who is struggling to balance life and work and family and if given the opportunity to talk with a professional about it, I’ll jump at the chance.

{Happy dance! I’m going back to therapy!}

I went ahead and booked appointments two weeks apart for September, October, November and December and then decided I needed to blog about this.

Maybe you’ve been feeling really down lately, or you’re struggling with your anger management and it’s affecting your home life. Or your glass of wine with dinner has turned into two or three, or maybe an entire bottle. Financial worries are giving you anxiety attacks and you are at a loss when it comes to what to do. If the weight of everyday life is crushing you and you’re gasping to catch your breath, it’s time to stop feeling ashamed and do something about it.

EAPs aren’t just for the employee, people! They include every family member on the plan, from what I understand. They can offer assistance in the following areas:

  • Counseling Services (Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, Mental Health issues, etc.)
  • Occupational Stress and Emotional Distress
  • Financial and Legal Advice
  • Family Support
  • Help with Work and Home Relationships
  • and more

Maybe I’m just naive in my estimate that many folks out there don’t realize they have access to this valuable resource. I certainly didn’t, even though they mailed us information and I read it and put the magnet on our fridge.

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My point is, if you’ve been wrestling with a personal issue and need someone to talk with, check your health insurance plan and see if you have access to an Employee Assistance Program. You may be pleasantly surprised and on your way to a happier, healthier you.

Do it for yourself, do it for your family. Namaste.

#ForMiriam I Advocate: World Mental Health Day

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When I think of what happened in DC last week, I keep coming back to the same feelings of anger, frustration and sadness.

Her life shouldn’t have ended that way.

There is something called Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Training, which is a training program developed in a number of U.S. states to help police officers react appropriately to situations involving mental illness or developmental delay. The Washington, DC chapter of the National Alliance for Mental Illness has a page on their website describing the District’s Crisis Intervention Officer Program, as having “had 5 graduated classes of officers so far, as well as new recruit trainings.”

I can’t help but wonder if the officer {or officers} who pulled the trigger had [Read more…]

Starting Over

Starting-OverThe show will go on in DC this coming May, 2014. I’m simply taking some time to figure out where to go from here, as my partnership unfortunately did not work out due to our vastly different work styles.

I have an incredible team surrounding me here in Virginia and I know that with all the hard work and passion that is going into this project, it most certainly will be a success. I may have failed at a partnership, but I will not fail at executing my vision for this show.

I envision this show to become a community of people coming together to embrace mental illness so as not to let it define them, but to propel a movement forward. A movement built on the belief that those of us living with mental illnesses are real people who simply need help. By coming together as a supportive society which fights for mental health services and programs, we will

change and save lives.

Please follow along here, and/or via Instagram and Twitter for updates as they become available. For now, if you’re local to the DC metro area, or you’re interested in coming in from out of town to see the show, mark your calendar for the weekend of May 17 & 18, 2014.

Thank you for all your support and I hope to see you at the show!

#OK2Talk: Join the Mental Health Movement

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Experiencing a psychotic break can be an isolating and debilitating event. If I talk about it, will everyone think I’m “crazy”? Will I lose my friends? Will I lose my job? Will I ever get better?

When mania grabbed a hold of my brain at the age of twenty-six, I thought my life was over. I had been hospitalized for three days and had to be tranquilized in order to force sleep, my mind brought back to reality only through the use of antipsychotics. The details were not pretty. I practically suffocated from the weight of keeping my pain bottled up inside. It seemed like no one in my immediate circle of family and friends understood what I had just gone through. My close friends tried, but the truth was everyone was so scared to talk about it.

I wanted desperately to find someone, anyone other than my psychiatrist and therapist, who knew what I was feeling. Wasn’t there anyone out there, a peer, who was like me?

My emotions pummeled my personality to the ground with their negativity. Thoughts raced through my head and nothing I did could make them stop.

Fear of the future. Guilt over what I had put my husband and family through. Sadness for the career that I had to leave behind. Disbelief in the words the doctors kept repeating. Anger that this was happening to me. Why me? Why?

I remember visiting bookstores with my parents where we’d search the Psychology section for titles that might help us understand what was happening to me. On one trip, my dad bought three thick paperbacks with promises on the cover which gave us hope. We went home and flipped through the pages, eager to find the answers to our questions.

We did find some, but they were clinical in nature. I was searching for different answers. I wanted to read personal stories of recovery and inspiration. I wanted to know that others had walked in my same shoes, had lost touch with reality, came crashing down to the darkest place they’ve ever felt, and made it out okay.

I wanted to know I’d be okay too.

Back then, in 2007, there weren’t many people blogging openly about bipolar disorder. There were women bloggers who were starting to open up about their experiences with postpartum depression, but blogging wasn’t nearly as prevalent as it is today. Social media was in its infancy, at least for regular Internet users like myself, so the ease in sharing information wasn’t quite there yet. You had to do the digging yourself, and my efforts at finding stories of hope and inspiration from other mental health consumers weren’t successful.

Back then.

The times, how they’re changing.

Today there are more and more people opening up each day about their journey to recovery from mental illnesses. There are blogs and vlogs, online support groups, Tedx talks, Facebook groups, and community performances which are educating the public on what it’s like to live with a mental illness. I’m proud to have opened up on my blog, sharing my true identity because I can now celebrate being a part of this change.

I can feel the change as its happening. I feel it in every email I get from a friend thanking me for writing about my story because they’ve been through something similar. I feel it in every message I receive on Facebook or Twitter from someone I’ve never met who has read my words and felt inspired to share their own.

This is how a movement starts.

It starts with one person who is brave enough to share,
who inspires others to share,
which in turn inspires the world to change.

 

On Tuesday I attended the launch event on Capitol Hill of #OK2TALK, a national media campaign produced by the National Association of Broadcasters in an effort to spread mental health awareness and teach young adults that sharing our stories of hope and healing can help others who are struggling. The campaign includes PSAs in both English and Spanish featuring teens and young adults talking openly about their experiences with mental illness. At the end of the ads, there is a call to action directing you to create the conversation about mental health online via social media.

NAB President and former Senator Gordon H. Smith described the campaign as “bringing the issue of mental health into the sunshine,” and I couldn’t agree more. I applaud the NAB for its commitment to increasing the awareness and understanding of mental health and I encourage you to contribute to the conversation via the blog, www.ok2talk.org.

Help is available and treatment is effective, and by encouraging society to be supportive of those struggling we will save lives.

 
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